Frequently Asked Questions

 

DOES YOUR PACK INCLUDE ALCOHOL/PEROXIDE?

Answer: After years of research, we now know that the caustic nature of hydrogen peroxide and rubbing alcohol (another commonly used first aid antiseptic) can destroy healthy cells and therefore affect wound healing

The FRFA alternative:  start by washing with soap and water, then apply antibiotic ointment and any one of our different dressing styles depending on the injury site and severity.

 

WHAT CAN WE USE TO STOP EXCESSIVE BLEEDING?

Answer: This kit does not come with a tactical tourniquet.  The reason for this is because injuries involving open arterial bleeding to an extremity is exceptionally rare in the combat sports setting. For this rare scenario, immediately apply direct pressure and call 911.

The FRFA alternative:  we supply our kits with Vaseline, skin glue, and butterfly stitches for facial cuts/lacerations, various gauze and pressure dressings for open extremity injuries, and wound seal applicators for nose bleeds.

 

HOW CAN FIGHT READY FIRST AID HELP MINIMIZE SCARRING AND INFECTION TO HASTEN WOUND HEALING?

Answer: properly cleaning and dressing wounds ASAP after they occur can reduce the risk of dangerous infections like MRSA (very common in combat sports), and help wounds heal faster and better, which will make for less of a scar.  Infections keep people out of the gym far longer than a wound that’s been properly cared for immediately. 

 

WHY DO I NEED A SLING AND SPLINT?

Answer: Slings and splints help when joints have been acutely injured: i.e. appear deformed and/or are causing a significant amount of pain, especially with movement.  These tools can help reduce the risk for worsening of the injury on the way to the hospital and make the pre-hospital/waiting room experience more comfortable for the injured athlete. Sometimes ER wait times are exceptionally long in today’s pandemic world.

 

WHAT IS BENZOIN AND WHY IS IT INCLUDED IN YOUR KIT?

Answer: Band-Aids fall off the moment the skin becomes sweaty

The FRFA alternative: Tincture of benzoin is used to help bandages stick to the skin.  Simply apply to the area surrounding the wound where the bandage will adhere, allow it to dry and become “tacky”, then place the bandage for a much stronger stick! 

 

WHAT DO YOU USE GLUCOSE AND ELECTROLYTE TABS FOR?

Answer:  Low blood sugar is an acute medical emergency which needs to be addressed quickly.  This most often happens to athletes who are diabetic, however, athletes who are “cutting” weight or practicing restrictive dieting are also at risk for low blood sugar. If the athlete is experiencing shakiness, irritability, sweating in the absence of physical activity, and/or feels faint, a tube of glucose will bump their blood sugar back up sufficiently so they can eat a more substantial meal.   DO NOT use this on an unconscious athlete with suspected low blood sugar.  Call 911 immediately. 

Electrolytes become slightly imbalanced easily during intense physical activity, causing painful muscle cramps, fatigue, faint feelings etc.  One tab will help the athlete overcome immediate symptoms until they can properly hydrate and eat. 

 

DO YOU HAVE ANY SAFETY TIPS FOR COMPETITIVE FIGHTERS?
If you have a break in your skin (mat burn, abrasions, cuts, lacerations) always immediately stop training and wash with soap and water, then dress the wound appropriately to reduce the risk of infection. 

 

If you are poked in the eye, immediately flush the eye, ideally with eyewash solution, which can be found in our FRFA kits.  Also, evaluate whether you are having excessive pain and/or any changes in your vision after it is flushed, and seek medical care as needed.

 

Learn how to fall appropriately/safely!  You can lessen the likelihood of extremity injuries by learning to break fall like a champion. 

 

For unconscious fighters (choked out or knocked out), DO NOT FLIP THEM ON THEIR BACKS AND RAISE THEIR FEET.  This practice is anecdotal, and counterproductive, and may cause an airway obstruction.  It does not help blood return to the head.

Unconscious athletes should have their mouthpiece removed and then be rolled to the side and placed in the “recovery position” until they regain consciousness.  This allows for their airway to remain open, and if the athlete vomits, they will not breathe the vomit into their lungs and worsen their condition.

 

Over the counter mouth guards can reduce your risk of concussion by 70%, while custom guards prepared by a dentist can reduce this risk even more. If your tooth is knocked out in a fight, place your tooth in a glass of milk or water and seek dental care immediately.